journal camp 2020

Journal Camp 2020 has begun! Our first session was ah-mazing in so many ways. By tradition, I will post out-takes from the best of the best. It’s raw, it’s real, it’s #journalcamp2020

She had grown restless and one night she pulled out the kitchen shears and went to work on the haircut she had paid too much for almost two months ago and now feared would be lost forever. It wasn’t as easy as it looked. She had sat in beauty shop chairs for decades, resenting the cost while loving the results. “How hard could it be?” she said. “I’ve got an eye for style,” she said. She misjudged the accuracy a beautician’s license conferred, and ended up with the look of mange — bald spots and choppy lines. House arrest might be a blessing after all. In the weeks following her home cut, She remembered the home perm she had given herself when they lived in Phoenix. That was a treatment from which there was no return, no passing Go, no collecting $200. She had been forced to live with the humiliation of a poodle perm until her hair grew long enough to cut out the frizzy parts. She broke up with her stylist then, unable to face her in that bubblegum pink salon with a helmet of straw.

journal me this

This just in: Journal Camp Workbook!  Based on my virtual Journal Camp series, this is a collection of inspiring, empowering, creative journal prompts to uplevel your writing practice.

Email me at coachcynthia.gregory@gmail.com with Journal Camp in the subject line and get a **free copy of Journal Camp Workbook delivered straight to your inbox.

Happy Journaling!

memory, memoir

Join us for a virtual writers retreat this October. Say hello to fresh inspiration, say good bye to excuses. #writerswrite

MEMOIR 1.

life: story.

join me for a private writing camp to begin the journey of publishing your memoir. Class size is limited for maximum creative effect. questions? email coachcynthia.gregory@gamil.com

xo-c.

may memoir.png

Journal Camp: Day 29

Ala Carte Blue

The color of her dress was a cross between periwinkle and the dusty blue of a prairie sky just after sunset. There was a pattern of small white flowers infused into the fabric that swayed in time to the movement of her hips. She was strong and young still, years from the strain of farms at auction, of entire communities vanishing, tilting toward the promise of union wages. Her eyes were green, and her nails were painted Ala Carte Blue. The hue of her dress and the blue of the tips of her fingers provoked a kind of stupor, a trance of scalded milk and blurry edges. The hem of her frock fell to just above her knees, exposing a slim white scar, the result of a tumble off her bike on that gravel road just off the old Red Rock bypass. When she walked a cup of coffee across the café, every head turned to watch the sway of that blue skirt, the set of those shoulders, the cadence of the quiet hum of her heart. The all wanted that coffee. They all wanted to be the cup in the palm of that hand.

Journal Camp: Day 18

My Grandfather’s Eyes
My grandfather was blind, so there was a terrible fascination with those vacant orbs. Because of this marginalized sense, he was reserved and quiet, and frightening. It could be that it was his personality to not interact much with the family. (After all, we were a loud and boisterous tribe of hooligans.) As a young child, I mostly observed him, fascinated and terrified. There was a large walk-in coat closet at the front of the house, where he kept an electric shaver. My dad used one of those death defying straight edge razors, so the fact that my grandpa could shave without being able to see was beyond comprehension. This was at a time in the world when men wore hats, and so did my grandpa. His forehead was pale from the hat, giving him a “farmer’s tan”, and those pale blue eyes peered out from under the brim of that soft grey hat and saw…shadows?  One day I was lying on the grass beneath a plum tree in the back yard. He shuffled by and paused, calling me by my sister’s name, scaring the hell out of me. He apparently had some sight, enough to make out the shape of a young girl, but to a silly child, it was horrifying to be identified by the blind man on a sunny Spokane summer day.  Grandpa possesed habits that shaped my world. He make popcorn on the stovetop. Without seeing. How did he know not to burn the corn kernels? It was beyond comprehension.  He used to sit in the kitchen at the yellow formica table, listening to baseball games on a transistor radio. He would sit for hours, listening to the play-by-play, announcers from cities like Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles. My grandpa’s blind eyes saw things that haunt me still.