retro reading

 

 

atwoody

We’ve been neglecting our reviews. Oh, we’ve written them, just haven’t shared, and that is just sad. So, the girls are returning to reviews with a retro read of Margaret Atwood. Here’s the tease:

To read The Edible Woman is to be transported back in time. Fourty-plus years ago “girls” had entered the workforce to stay. They wore binding girdles, deferred to the men in the company, and were expected to resign when they became engaged and left maindenhood behind. Still, they were there, earning their way.

read more here

Read the World

I always felt that I wouldn’t have anything to say as a writer until I had lived a little. Apparently, I’m not the only one. To that point, Persephone’s Step Sisters is pleased to share this post.

Source: Read the World

graceful language

Inspiration comes in the most interesting places. Donna Tartt talks about hers, and what it took to write The Goldfinch. Watch  the interview here and leave a comment!

what’s on your plate?

Fiction is a beautiful way to stick a finger in the eye of complacency, don’t you think?  In a debut novel that is both funny and disturbing, Stephan Eirik Clark jumps feet first into a pool of what might be satire, taking a lingering look at how, as consumers of unnatural “food,”  we might unintentionally be the makers of our own undoing. Is it possible? Is industrial food safe? Or is it just funny?

You decide. Read the review here.

sweetness

give me water

there is something very compelling about something so simple as water. get enough of it? take if for granted? watch this vid and change your mind about water. forever.

grantwriting 101

fundraising has turned into something of an art in the last decade. Along with the art has come plenty of competition. Why wouldn’t you do all you can to get your grant funded? It’s more than just luck, according to the Fundraising Strategist. Yep.

Lucky-four-leaf-clover-by-Umberto-Salvagnin-Creative-Commons

Oh Beautiful for Spacious Skies…

Unknown

 Real Freedom is Never Free

With the penning of the Declaration of Independence on this date in 1776, and the ratification of the United States Constitution beginning in 1787, the Founding Fathers and their political and intellectual progeny set in motion one of the greatest social experiments ever undertaken by a society:  a democracy of, by and for the people, as Abraham Lincoln recalled in his now famous Gettysburg Address.  It has never been easy, this little love affair we have with individual vs. societal rights, and if events of the last few years are any indication, it’s not going to lighten up anytime soon.  As we continue our forward roll into the 21st century where conventional definitions of all we have known and held dear seem to be rapidly falling by the wayside, we’d be wise to remember that the Founding Fathers didn’t have all the answers either.  What they did have was the courage, the vision, and the tenacity of spirit to ask the right questions, and to strive for answers that would benefit the many, not just the few.  United We Stand.  It’s always been the best and brightest version of us.  Happy 4th of July, America!